Discover Blogging: Episode 13 | WordPress Plans: Putting things in perspective

Having discussed the 4 plans offered by WordPress.com in the previous 4 episodes of this series (Go back to Episode 12: WordPress Business Plan), let me do a quick recap, consolidate and assimilate the ideas here. Here is the list: Free ($0), Personal ($4), Premium ($8) and Business (~$25).

Free plan

The Free plan allows you to choose a sub-domain of wordpress.com like mkbhanu.wordpress.com. You can’t have a custom domain like mkbhanu.com. WordPress Ads are displayed on your blog. You need to upgrade at least to the Personal Plan to have your own domain name. There are one hundred themes to choose from. The themes are varied in the features offered, layout, style and topic (Art, Business, Blog, etc.) and you will most likely get one suitable for your need.

Personal Plan

The Personal Plan lets you build your personal brand through domain name like experienceblogging.com and entitles you to email and live chat support. You also get rid of WordPress Ads.

Premium Plan

The Premium Plan grants you unlimited access to premium themes (almost 200) which have advanced look-and-feel and are rich in design features. You can use any of them and change when you want. It also allows you to participate in their powerful Ad program and earn money by placing Ads on your blog.

Business plan

Business plan is the most exhaustive plan and offers maximum features and functions including installation of custom-plugins. WordPress plug-in architecture is one major reason behind its popularity. To know more about the plug-ins and advanced features in more detail, please refer to Episode 12: WordPress Business Plan.

Putting things in perspective

Business Plan is the highest plan and provides you capabilities of a self-hosted blog (or site) using WordPress.org flavor. You can upload custom themes and install custom plug-ins. With a Business Plan, you enjoy the freedom of self-hosting with the security of WordPress.com leaving technical stuff like regular back-ups, updates, performance tuning, etc. to them so that you can focus on what is really important for you: your content. The lower plans don’t allow to install custom plug-ins or use custom themes. In fact, as you move down in the plan upgrade hierarchy, you are stripped of capabilities gradually.

Let me finish this episode here with the hope that it really helped you to make sense of WordPress.com Plans. Thanks for stopping by! Leave comment below if you have any questions...

✧ Disclaimer: My blog posts include reviews of products helpful for bloggers and have affiliate links. In this post, it is WordPress.com. I have purchased, used and tested it thoroughly. I earn commission if you buy a paid plan using the link. Rest assured, it doesn’t cost you extra and you pay the same price. It helps me to fund the costs and time spent on my blog and site. Thanks for using it.
✧Image courtesy of Stuart Miles @ www.freerangestock.com

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